Articles | Volume 11, issue 1
Earth Syst. Dynam., 11, 301–318, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-11-301-2020

Special issue: Large Ensemble Climate Model Simulations: Exploring Natural...

Earth Syst. Dynam., 11, 301–318, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-11-301-2020

Research article 26 Mar 2020

Research article | 26 Mar 2020

Winter hydrometeorological extreme events modulated by large-scale atmospheric circulation in southern Ontario

Olivier Champagne et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (29 Dec 2019) by Nicola Maher
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (25 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Feb 2020) by Nicola Maher
AR by Olivier Champagne on behalf of the Authors (03 Feb 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Feb 2020) by Nicola Maher
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Short summary
Southern Ontario has seen more high flows in winter recently due to earlier snowmelt. We show that 10 mm of daily rain and temperature higher than 5 °C are necessary conditions to generate winter high flows in the historical period. These conditions are associated with high pressure on the east coast bringing warm and wet conditions from the south. In the future, as snowfall decreases, warm events will generate less high flows, while rainfall will become a greater high-flow contributor.
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