Articles | Volume 14, issue 6
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-14-1317-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-14-1317-2023
Research article
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20 Dec 2023
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 20 Dec 2023

The Indonesian Throughflow circulation under solar geoengineering

Chencheng Shen, John C. Moore, Heri Kuswanto, and Liyun Zhao

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There is a noted paucity of studies looking at the effects of geoengineering on the ocean and its circulation. Also, this region is very important as the driver of the MJO and subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability. We need more studies looking at things like this.
Short summary
The Indonesia Throughflow is an important pathway connecting the Pacific and Indian oceans and is part of a wind-driven circulation that is expected to reduce under greenhouse gas forcing. Solar dimming and sulfate aerosol injection geoengineering may reverse this effect. But stratospheric sulfate aerosols affect winds more than simply ``shading the sun''; they cause a reduction in water transport similar to that we simulate for a scenario with unabated greenhouse gas emissions.
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