Articles | Volume 12, issue 4
Earth Syst. Dynam., 12, 1239–1251, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-12-1239-2021
Earth Syst. Dynam., 12, 1239–1251, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-12-1239-2021

Research article 24 Nov 2021

Research article | 24 Nov 2021

Wind speed stilling and its recovery due to internal climate variability

Jan Wohland et al.

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Cited articles

Befort, D. J., Wild, S., Kruschke, T., Ulbrich, U., and Leckebusch, G. C.: Different long-term trends of extra-tropical cyclones and windstorms in ERA-20C and NOAA-20CR reanalyses: Extra-tropical cyclones and windstorms in 20th century reanalyses, Atmos. Sci. Lett., 17, 586–595, https://doi.org/10.1002/asl.694, 2016. a
Bichet, A., Wild, M., Folini, D., and Schär, C.: Causes for decadal variations of wind speed over land: Sensitivity studies with a global climate model: Decadal Variations Of Land Wind Speed, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L11701, https://doi.org/10.1029/2012GL051685, 2012. a, b, c, d
Bloomfield, H. C., Shaffrey, L. C., Hodges, K. I., and Vidale, P. L.: A critical assessment of the long-term changes in the wintertime surface Arctic Oscillation and Northern Hemisphere storminess in the ERA20C reanalysis, Environ. Res. Lett., 13, 094004, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aad5c5, 2018. a
Cardone, V. J., Greenwood, J. G., and Cane, M. A.: On trends in historical marine wind data, J. Climate, 3, 113–127, 1990. a
Earth System Grid Federation: Climate Model Intercomparison Project – Phase 6, https://esgf-data.dkrz.de/search/cmip6-dkrz/, last access: 12 November 2021. a
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Short summary
Surface winds fluctuate. From around 1980 to 2010, surface onshore winds generally became weaker, and they have gained in strength since then. While these fluctuations are well known, we currently do not fully understand why they happen. To investigate the reasons, we use a large set of climate simulations with one model, a so-called large ensemble. We find that the observed long-term wind fluctuations occur naturally under current and future conditions and do not require a specific trigger.
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