Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-2024-8
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-2024-8
30 Apr 2024
 | 30 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESD.

Spatiotemporal variation of growth-stage specific compound climate extremes for rice in South China: Evidence from concurrent and consecutive compound events

Ran Sun, Tao Ye, Yiqing Liu, Weihang Liu, and Shuo Chen

Abstract. There is increasing concern regarding the impact of compound agroclimatic extreme events on crop yield, particularly in the context of projected increases in their frequency and intensity due to climate change. While previous studies have generally focused on compound hot and dry events in maize and wheat using growing-season relative thresholds, the time-variant physiological sensitivity of crops to climate extremes has not been sufficiently considered. We determined the spatiotemporal variations of compound climate extremes (CEs) for single- and late-rice in southern China during 1980–2014 and their underlying drivers using growth-stage specific physiological thresholds. Specifically, we carefully distinguished between concurrent compound events (CCEs) and consecutive compound events (CSEs). Our results indicated an increasing trend of compound hot-dry events for single-rice, but a decreasing trend of compound chilling-rainy events for late-rice. Spatially, the hotspots of compound hot-dry events for single-rice shifted from the lower Yangtze River Basin to its upper stream, and were dominated by the spatial differences in phenology rather than the occurrence of extreme events. The hotspots of compound chilling-rainy events for late-rice remained concentrated near the northwest edges of late-rice growing areas, indicating the limitation of thermal conditions. The occurrence and duration of CCEs was closely related to local temperature-moisture coupling (negative correlation). A path analysis suggested that temperature was the dominant factor influencing the changes in compound hot-dry events for single-rice. For the changes in compound chilling-rainy events for late-rice, the effect of temperature was only slightly larger than that of moisture. Our study has improved the understanding of compound climate extremes in China’s rice production system, and the results provide important information for risk management and adaptation strategies under climate change.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Ran Sun, Tao Ye, Yiqing Liu, Weihang Liu, and Shuo Chen

Status: open (until 20 Jul 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on esd-2024-8', Anonymous Referee #1, 30 May 2024 reply
Ran Sun, Tao Ye, Yiqing Liu, Weihang Liu, and Shuo Chen

Data sets

A daily 0.25° × 0.25° hydrologically based land surface flux dataset for conterminous China, 1961–2017 Yue Miao and Aihui Wang https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2020.125413

Ran Sun, Tao Ye, Yiqing Liu, Weihang Liu, and Shuo Chen

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Short summary
We found increasing trend of compound hot-dry events for single-rice but decreasing trend of compound chilling-rainy events for late-rice. We also found that the occurrence and duration of concurrent CEs were negatively correlated with local temperature-moisture coupling. Temperature was the dominant factor influencing the change of compound hot-dry events. While for the change in compound chilling-rainy events, the effect of temperature is only slightly larger than that of moisture.
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