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Earth System Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-2019-77
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-2019-77
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 10 Dec 2019

Submitted as: research article | 10 Dec 2019

Review status
A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ESD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Relating Climate Sensitivity Indices to projection uncertainty

Benjamin Sanderson1,2 Benjamin Sanderson
  • 1CERFACS, Toulouse, France
  • 2NCAR, Boulder CO, USA

Abstract. Can we summarize uncertainties in global response to greenhouse gas forcing with a single number? Here we assess the degree to which traditional metrics are related to future warming indices using an ensemble of simple climate models together with results from CMIP5 and CMIP6. We consider Effective Climate Sensitivity (EffCS), Transient Climate Response at CO2 quadrupling (T140) and a proposed simple metric of temperature change 140 years after a quadrupling of carbon dioxide (A140). In a perfectly equilibrated model, future temperatures under a non-mitigation scenario are almost perfectly described by T140, whereas in a strongly mitigated future, both ECS and T140 are found to be poor predictors of 21st century warming, and future temperatures are better correlated with A140. However, we show that T140 and EffCS calculated in full CMIP simulations are subject to errors arising from control model drift and internal variability. Simulating these factors in the simple model leads to 30 % relative error in the measured value of T140, but only a 10 % error for EffCS. As such, measured values of EffCS can be better correlated with true TCR than measured values of TCR itself. We propose that this could be an explanatory factor in the previously noted surprising result that EffCS is a better predictor than TCR of future transient warming under RCP8.5.

Benjamin Sanderson

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Benjamin Sanderson

Benjamin Sanderson

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Latest update: 11 Jul 2020
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Short summary
Here we assess the degree to which the idealized responses to transient forcing increase and step change forcing increase relate to warming under future scenarios. We find a possible explanation for the poor performance of transient metrics (relative to equilibrium response) as a metric of high emission future warming in terms of their sensitivity to non-equilibrated initial conditions, and propose alternative metrics which better describe warming under high mitigation scenarios.
Here we assess the degree to which the idealized responses to transient forcing increase and...
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